Looking for contributors

Pee Dee Folks is looking for people who would like to contribute brief articles about happenings in the smaller communities in the Pee Dee Region which go under-served by the city newspapers. There is currently no funding of any kind for this project, but exposure is always helpful for beginning writers. Perhaps a little brainstorming will help to remedy the financing issue.

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Artisan Outpost in Johnsonville, July 13, 2013

Johnsonville Mayor Steve Dukes cuts the ribbon for the opening day of the Artisan Outpost.

Johnsonville Mayor Steve Dukes cuts the ribbon for the opening day of the Artisan Outpost.

…waiting… wondering… hoping… and praying…

All of the above and more have filled the many anxious moments between the June meeting of the Johnsonville City Council when she was given the go ahead, and July 13, for Jackie Stasney, the chief organizer and visionary for the Artisan Outpost.  July 13 was the fulfillment of a year-long dream.

Obviously her dreaming has paid off, because in about 30 short days Jackie with the help of a few cohorts like Jane Madden, and Mona Dukes, were able to get the building ready for the public, publicize the event, as well as locate and bring in 27 vendors from Johnsonville, Hemingway and the surrounding communities, including two from Myrtle Beach and one from as far as Camden.

The artists, craftsmen, and other vendors were also eagerly waiting, wondering, hoping, and praying… This was the first event of the Artisan Outpost. Would the people come? Everyone’s fears subsided as the people showed up beyond their expectations. Jackie and her husband attempted to count the guests and are confident there were more than 300 visitors.

The Artisan Outpost enjoyed a steady stream of shoppers.

The Artisan Outpost enjoyed a steady stream of shoppers.

Guests enjoyed an impressive variety of handcrafts. Jackie Stasney displayed her handcrafted gemstone jewelry. Leslie Belflower brought paintings and handpainted items including plaques and gourds. Pat Singletary displayed her unique one stroke painting craft items. Jane Madden brought beautiful silk scarves; Jim Gleason displayed his unique wind instrument sculptures; and Chrissy Smith brought hand woven jewelry.

Tom Stasney brought old fashioned Williamsburg apple tree forms. Janice Green displayed Bible quilts and sold Bible storybooks she wrote. Marvin Russ brought produce and his own sugar cane syrup processed on his farm in Coward. Sally Haynes brought herbs and Barb Matthews brought plants.

Lavonia Olsen displayed crocheted scarves while Sherise Jackell brought her specialty – gourmet homemade dog treats. Debbie Hanna brought a spread of baked goods. Joyce McDaniel brought colorful baskets she made from rolled magazine pages. Alexe Miles displayed a wide assortment of metal and wooden signs. Ron Stephan brought several plaques and entertained us by playing a dulcimer he crafted from wood.

Sherry Salazer brought an assortment of handcrafts including plaques and grocery bag holders; Rev. John Cribb brought prints of his watercolor paintings – “Memories of a Sandlapper” and “Memories of a Tarheel.” Dianne Moen brought a wide variety of home-canned goodies; Taylor Burkett brought painted birdhouses and plaques; and Stephanie Gore brought wreaths. Ed Polumbo brought wooden trays and items, mostly made from recycled wood. Becky Ratz brought handmade soap; Fred Riales brought art made from seashells and paintings. Mary Lynn Hope brought hand painted glass, pillows, and lampshades.

Taking chances on the weather, which turned out to be beautiful, Meck Hartfield set up outdoors to demonstrate his blacksmith skills and display his wares. And Terry Owens served delicious chicken bog in a cup from his booth under a tent.

Customers went home with newfound treasures. Sales were good, and while it is doubtful any vendors struck it rich at the Artisan Outpost, venders left with a good feeling about the event and were making plans to return on August 3 for the next Artisan Outpost day.

“I am amazed and grateful for the support from our community for our first event,” Jackie reflected when it was all over. “This has been a dream of mine for about a year now and to see it come true is humbling. It was a wonderful mix of talented people in one place. I was just amazed at the turnout of people….I didn’t think we would draw that large of a crowd with such a short time to get the word out,”

For more information, please contact Jackie Stasney at 843.621.1751 or visit the Artisan Outpost Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/artisanoutpostjohnsonvillesc

Janice Green's quilts are the pictures in her Bible storybooks.

Janice Green’s quilts are the pictures in her Bible storybooks.

Dianne Moen's canned goods

Dianne Moen’s canned goods

Meck Hartfield demonstrates his blacksmith skills.

Meck Hartfield demonstrates his blacksmith skills.

Becky Ratz showing one of her molded homemade soaps.

Becky Ratz showing one of her molded homemade soaps.

Joyce McDaniel and her husband with their display of bowls made from folded magazine pages.

Joyce McDaniel and her husband with their display of bowls made from folded magazine pages.

Jim Gleason with his sculptures made from musical instrument parts.

Jim Gleason with his sculptures made from musical instrument parts.

John Cribb with his watercolor prints.

John Cribb with his watercolor prints.

Posted in Johnsonville | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Scott’s BBQ goes to the Big Apple Barbecue Block Party

Home of Scott's Bar-be-que

Home of Scott’s Bar-B-Que

Rodney Scott, owner of Hemingway’s very own Scott’s Bar-B-Que participated in the 11th-Annual Big Apple Barbecue Block Party at Madison Square Park in Manhattan, NY, on June 8-9, 2013. Invitations to participate in the Barbeque Block Party went only to the best “pitmasters” who specialize in the pit BBQ method of slow-cooked pork, beef, or chicken. Rodney Scott was one of two pitmasters from South Carolina. Sixteen other pitmasters came from scattered locations, mostly from across the southeast. The Big Apple Barbecue Block Party is a benefit for Madison Square Park.

Rodney Scott’s father, “Rosie” (Rossevelt) Scott started the Scott’s Bar-B-Que business over thirty years ago. The Scotts serve only pork BBQ that has been cooked ever so slowly over oak wood coals. Slow cooking is the secret to making pit BBQ. As the meat cooks it slowly drips juices onto the wood coals which make the smoke that flavors the meat. The Scotts have their own secret low-country sauce recipe that they don’t give out. Rodney says the secret ingredient is love. Every year Scott’s Bar-B-Que throws a free BBQ for the local community.

Scott’s Bar-B-Que is open for business Wednesday through Saturday. Check out their web page at www.thescottsbbq.com.

Thanks to Ellen Session for this picture of the fresh hogs on the way to the BBQ pit for cooking:

Fresh hogs ready for the BBQ pit.

Fresh hogs ready for the BBQ pit.

Inetta Cooper provided the following pictures that she took at the Big Apple Barbecue Block Party in Manhattan.

Setting up to cook BBQ in NY.

Setting up to cook BBQ in NY.

Rodney Scott tasting BBQ

Rodney Scott tasting BBQ

Great BBQ ready to go...

Great BBQ ready to go…

Scott's Bar-B-Que sign

Scott’s Bar-B-Que sign

Scott's Bar-B-Que T-shirt

Scott’s Bar-B-Que T-shirt

The NY Times created this video about Scott’s Bar-B-Que on June 9, 2009.

 

Posted in Hemingway, Pee Dee Cuisine | Tagged | Leave a comment

Remembering a great father: Bobby Faircloth Sr.

Bobby Faircloth Sr.

Bobby Faircloth Sr.

The Maple Cotton Mill in Dillon, SC, hummed with activity on Oct 3, 1926. My Aunt Ollie wanted to get off work early. It was Friday – payday – and she was only 15 years old. She asked her supervisor if he would let her go early. He gave her terms for getting off early and she was shocked.

She went straight to her daddy in the mechanic’s shop and told him what her supervisor said to her. He stopped what he was doing and went into the mill to have a word with the supervisor. He argued with the man and told him if he ever said another word to his daughter or daughter-in-law he would be sorry. Then he went back to work.

Early Saturday morning he told his wife he was going to the shop for a little while because there was a part that had to be fixed before Monday morning, but he would be home for dinner. He would be working by himself.

After a couple of hours a car pulled up outside the mechanic’s shop. Aunt Ollie’s supervisor was in the car with a friend, and they were both drunk. He called Grandpa out, saying they needed to talk about the day before. Grandpa walked out. The man threatened Grandpa and called him names. Grandpa told him to get out of there before he made him sorry he came. The man pulled a gun and shot Grandpa. Then they jumped into their car and drove off. Badly wounded in the stomach, he made his way towards home. It wasn’t far but it took him a long time because he was losing so much blood. He made it home, got inside and said, “He’s killed me,” and collapsed.

He was rushed to Florence General Hospital in Florence, SC, the closest hospital. He had emergency surgery and everyone waited around to see if he would make it. Tuesday, October 6, my grandfather, Brock Faircloth died. He was only 46 years old. He left a wife, four small children and his two older children—Ollie, a fifteen year old girl and Bobby, a seventeen year old man-boy who had taken a bride in February and still lived in his father’s home. No welfare, no social security.

The burden of caring for the family now fell on Bobby’s young shoulders. He and his wife had finally found a good house and they were expecting their first child in March. The money he had saved for furniture went to bury his father. He stayed and worked and supported his father’s family with a little help from his sister until she married. He remained until the young children were old enough to work. The girls married young.

Finally, with three children of his own he and his wife moved into their own home. Bobby worked hard and gave his wife and children everything he could. He never complained. He was a good son, a great husband and the best father anyone could ask for. I followed him around whenever I was given the opportunity—I was Daddy’s girl. I learned to drive a nail, paint a fence, and plant a tree under his guidance. Most importantly I learned to be fair, to be compassionate, to be honest, to work hard and to not complain about it. I learned what love really is from my father. Bobby Faircloth Sr. was born December 20, 1907 and blessed my life until November 20, 1982 when the Lord took him home so he could rest.

Happy Father’s Day, Daddy; Happy Father’s Day to all you Dad’s that are there for your kids, you are special.

Posted in Dillon, Heroes from the Pee Dee, Uncategorized | Leave a comment